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Knee Rehabilitation

Knee injuries are common and occur in two main categories of onset. Traumatic injuries from sports and falls are one major source. Sports are at an all-time high in our country, and now comprise a very diverse array of activities. From the traditional sports like football to very popular sports like skate and snowboarding, roller blading, or even breakdancing. The variety of stresses landing on the knee is expanding as fast as people’s desire for physical challenge. Unfortunately, the knee is not built to rotate or translate with much amplitude and so ligament and cartilage damage is a common consequence as the sports become more extreme. Modern surgical methods have made ligament and cartilage injuries a fairly routine procedure and combined with a proper physical therapy rehabilitation program, a person can be back in action often with full function in a year or less after major knee surgery. The world of sports medicine has advanced light-years from 40-50 years ago in terms of surgical procedures and rehabilitation strategies. This has benefitted the professional athlete all the way down to the occasional runner who just wants to stay active in terms of what modern medicine has to offer. Physical therapy has formed a strong partnership with the orthopedic surgeon since most post op situation need PT for the surgery to reach its full potential.

The second class of injuries relates to overuse problems around the knee such as Patellofemoral tracking syndrome, tendonitis, or ITB syndrome. Since running is the basis for many sports, an imbalance in what is called the functional kinetic chain from the foot to the pelvis could be responsible for pain originating in the knee. Physical therapy is the only profession that will approach the issue with a wide angle lens to identify the right targets to treat and build support around the knee for repetitive stress.

Common conditions we help:

  • Post-surgery recovery and rehab
  • Meniscus pain and problems
  • Sports injuries
  • Ligament injuries
  • Patellofemoral Tracking syndrome
  • ITB syndrome
  • Muscle tightness and inflammation.